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R U OK?

By hello 20 Nov, 2017

In an Australian first, R U OK? and Taste of Melbourne in partnership with Electrolux are joining forces with celebrity chefs to launch Conversation Bites, a charity restaurant initiative to raise funds for suicide prevention and to encourage meaningful conversations from 30 November – 3 December in Yarra Park.

 

Celebrity chefs including Dan Hunter, Raymond Capaldi, Sam Pinzone and Geoff Lindsay, will combine their passion for food and suicide prevention to create a delicious ‘Conversation Bites’ menu and design a limited-edition dish for the R U OK? restaurant to share with loved ones.

 

A percentage of the proceeds from the restaurant will fund additional R U OK? campaigns and resources to generate more life-changing conversations.

 

R U OK? CEO Brendan Maher said: “Whether you’re a foodie or not, tough times can sometimes wear us down. That’s why R U OK? has teamed up with Taste of Australia, to get people together over food. Because a problem shared is a problem halved, and a great place to start is by asking, “are you ok?”

 

“Eight people per day take their own lives in Australia. So, how do we reduce that number? We need people to taco ‘bout it – not just on R U OK? Day, but 365 days a year.

 

“We are really proud to launch this first charity restaurant at Taste of Melbourne, and hope to replicate the idea across the country.”

 

Conversation Bites pop up restaurant and menu will be available exclusively at Taste of Melbourne, with four dishes being created by the line-up of chefs.

 

For more information on how to get the conversation started, visit ruok.org.au .

By hello 26 Oct, 2017

Rachel Clements is the Director of Psychological Services at the Centre for Corporate Health and member of the R U OK? Conversation Think Tank. She shares her tips for managing the transition out of the workforce: 

Q. What affect can transitioning out of the workforce have on me?  

“Transitioning out of the workforce can be a stressful time for you financially, emotionally and can impact your relationships and health. "Those who have strong social support and who are engaged in the community usually have the smoothest and most enjoyable transition. This is important when going through any change in your life because supportive relationships are one of the strongest buffers for our mental health and resilience. We encourage anyone facing a period of change to start planning activities and touch points that will help them stay connected to their support network. "

We encourage anyone going through a career change to set out a plan and seek professional advice to help them manage these changes - like talking to your financial advisors and trusted health professionals.” 


What can I do to manage the transition?  

  •  Understand that it may take time to adjust to the change.
  • Set some personal goals for after the transition to keep you on track and feeling a sense of purpose, achievement and motivation. Consulting a career coach can be a great way of helping with this.
  • Before you transition or retire, think about what you plan to do with your extra time. Having meaning and purpose is very important for maintaining your wellbeing throughout this time of transition. You might consider joining community groups or clubs to build your social support network or volunteer in a field you are passionate about.
  • Focus on your health and fitness to help make this new time in your life enjoyable and ward off excessive health care costs.
  • Get your finances in order and find new ways to cut your expenses to reduce any financial pressure.
  • Talk to your friends and family about what you want your transition or retirement to look like. This helps manage their expectations and provide insight into what early warning signs may look like should you appear to be struggling with the adjustment.
  • Stay connected to friends and family.

 Q. How can family and friends support someone transitioning out of the workforce?  

“The support of colleagues, friends and families can really help someone regain their balance and feel a sense of comfort, confidence and control during this period of transition and change. “A number of factors can affect how someone copes with the transition – their financial situation; their health, both psychological and physical; and their perception of what that next step will be. Friends, family and colleagues can play an important role in helping someone process the change by checking in regularly over the phone, face to face or via SMS.” 

What are some of the signs someone might be struggling with the transition? 

The early warning signs include: • Irritability and frustration 

  • Anger 
  • Moods swings 
  • Withdrawal from friends and family 
  • Sleep disturbance 
  • Ceasing usual activities

 Q. What can I do if someone’s struggling with the transition?  

“If you notice they’re not coping, it is important to have a supportive conversation with them to help them get back on track. Encouraging them to get active, try something new or join a community group can all help in reducing feelings of loneliness and helplessness. 

“If you notice that they are experiencing low mood, increased anxiety or have not been themselves for longer than two weeks, it is important to encourage them to speak to their GP or another health professional such as a psychologist to help them manage the transition and get back on track.” 

Find tips to get the conversation started here.

Find helplines and professional supports here.

By hello 23 Oct, 2017

In 2010, R U OK? Ambassador, Board Member and host of Channel10’s The Living Room, Barry Du Bois learned that he had plasmacytoma myeloma, a cancer of the immune system which attacks healthy bone marrow. He publicly shared the story of his cancer battle.  Following an operation, and radiotherapy, Barry received the good news that the cancer was under management, but still in his body, and he was regularly monitored.

 

Last Friday, Barry shared with The Living Room viewers his latest news - that his last blood result showed that his cancer had returned, relatively aggressively.

 

Barry has used his announcement to emphasise the importance of social support for those living with cancer, saying:

 

“I am lucky to be going into this battle with the love and support of so many people. I know how much they care for me. I am also very aware of how much my wife, and my friends and family need their own support through this time. As an ambassador for R U OK? I’m passionate about their ethos, which encourages meaningful conversations, in everyday life.”

 

Barry also shared his advice for friends, family and loved ones supporting someone through an illness, saying:

 

“If you are supporting someone be it a physical or mental health situation, I would encourage you also to seek some help, and to talk to those around you. Asking, Listening, Encouraging action and Checking in are the 4 steps to helping someone you care about navigate a tough time in their life. At times like this we need to be vigilant and keep checking in with each other. If we feel a conversation has become too big and you need extra support, R U OK? has a help seeking page you should refer to. Go to www.ruok.org.au/findhelp

 

R U OK? CEO Brendan Maher has joined Barry’s call to support those facing the diagnosis and their loved ones, saying:

 

“Barry Du Bois has been a tireless advocate for R U OK?, championing stronger support for those who are struggling with life. As Barry faces this battle he has the care and support of those around him, and the entire R U OK? team. We join his call and encourage everyone to be present, available, supportive and non-judgemental of those facing similar battles.”

 

Each year in Australia around 1700 people are diagnosed with myeloma - the equivalent of four people every day. If you or a loved one are affected by cancer you can find information, resources and advice at cancer.org.au

 

If you’re supporting a loved one with cancer this booklet might help.

More Posts

R U OK?

By hello 20 Nov, 2017

In an Australian first, R U OK? and Taste of Melbourne in partnership with Electrolux are joining forces with celebrity chefs to launch Conversation Bites, a charity restaurant initiative to raise funds for suicide prevention and to encourage meaningful conversations from 30 November – 3 December in Yarra Park.

 

Celebrity chefs including Dan Hunter, Raymond Capaldi, Sam Pinzone and Geoff Lindsay, will combine their passion for food and suicide prevention to create a delicious ‘Conversation Bites’ menu and design a limited-edition dish for the R U OK? restaurant to share with loved ones.

 

A percentage of the proceeds from the restaurant will fund additional R U OK? campaigns and resources to generate more life-changing conversations.

 

R U OK? CEO Brendan Maher said: “Whether you’re a foodie or not, tough times can sometimes wear us down. That’s why R U OK? has teamed up with Taste of Australia, to get people together over food. Because a problem shared is a problem halved, and a great place to start is by asking, “are you ok?”

 

“Eight people per day take their own lives in Australia. So, how do we reduce that number? We need people to taco ‘bout it – not just on R U OK? Day, but 365 days a year.

 

“We are really proud to launch this first charity restaurant at Taste of Melbourne, and hope to replicate the idea across the country.”

 

Conversation Bites pop up restaurant and menu will be available exclusively at Taste of Melbourne, with four dishes being created by the line-up of chefs.

 

For more information on how to get the conversation started, visit ruok.org.au .

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